This Week in Fitness: 2nd-8th December

Published on: 
08 December 19
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3 min read

There’s a lot going on in the world of fitness in the lead up to Christmas. Peloton is causing controversy with its Christmas ad, retailers are ‘wooing’ customers with fitness perks and Lululemon’s stock is up 80%.

Technology today has disrupted every business. It is strategically integrated into every industry and has helped advance it, be it health, education or automobile. Fitness industry is no exception.

Via Entrepreneur India. Read full article here.

In case you missed it, oil is no longer the world’s most valuable resource. According to The Economist, data is the new commodity fuelling growth and change across all industries. The health and fitness industry is one example that has been bombarded with enormous amounts of data, collected and uploaded in a constant stream from multiple sources.

Via Value Walk. Read full article here.

Famed for his work with High-Intensity Training and Nautilus machines, Jones helped effect a change in gym cultures across the United States and the wider world. Thanks to Jones’ ideas, training with machines became acceptable for gym-goers, the standard of machines rose exponentially, and bodybuilding was introduced to greats like Mike Mentzer and Dorian Yates.

Via Bar Bend. Read full article here.

For all the outcry about the Peloton holiday ad, some of the company’s enthusiasts are scratching their heads. Take Heather Haworth, a California-based in-house counsel for a medical device company, who posted about her thoughts on the ad earlier this week on Facebook. Haworth told CNBC her Peloton bike, a birthday gift last year, has helped her prioritize her health as she juggles work, family and everything else. While Peloton has been widely criticized this week, she and other Peloton users are defending the ad and the company behind it.

Via CNBC. Read full article here.

To get customers in the door, retailers — whether grocery stores or athleisure brands — are offering fitness classes. It’s not a bad idea considering the popularity of working out these days, combined with the struggles of brick-and-mortar. 

Whole Foods leads the charge on this front, which doesn’t come as a surprise. Its flagship store in Austin hosts rooftop classes taught by instructors from local studios. But it’s not just upscale health food stores getting in on the trend. Hy-Vee, a Midwestern grocery chain, has partnered with Orangetheory Fitness to build studios connected to two of its locations.

Via Skift. Read full article here.

Amid the so-called death of retail that has occurred in recent years, yoga-pants maker Lululemon has noticeably bucked the trend. Rapidly growing revenue has helped its stock price surge more than 80% this year, as the company looks to expand in areas like menswear, e-commerce, and international sales.

Via Forbes. Read full article here.

Fitness Australia has advised that a survey of its industry business members asking for predictions for next year anticipates that ‘Exercise is Medicine’ will be the hottest trend in the fitness industry for 2020.

Exercise is Medicine® is a global health initiative that is focused on encouraging primary care medical professionals and other health care providers to include physical activity assessment and associated treatment recommendations as part of every patient visit and referring their patients to exercise professionals.

Via AusLeisure. Read full article here.

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